Brough's Books on Wendy Beckett

Sister Wendy Beckett

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Max Beckmann and the Self
by Sister Wendy Beckett
Listed under Max Beckmann

Sister Wendy's American Collection
by Toby Eady Associates (Editor), et al
 

Sister Wendy's catholic view of art is as rare as her insightful view of Western religious painting. The work she admires is startlingly diverse, embracing Paul Revere's silver and a bodhisattva from Pakistan, an Issey Miyake metallic polyester dress and a Mayan vase, not to mention paintings by artists as remote in style and vision as John Singer Sargent and Joan Mitchell. Sister Wendy's American Collection is a highly selective tour through six major U.S. museums: the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Cleveland Museum of Art in Ohio, the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. To frequent museumgoers, her choices initially can seem charmingly arbitrary--until they begin to inspire the urge to check out those galleries again. 

With a page or two allotted to each art work (short essays in large type and 250-odd modestly sized illustrations), this is a friendly book to curl up with, as unpretentious as Sister Wendy herself. Anyone looking for detailed art historical information will be disappointed by her tendency to coast on a thimbleful of facts, yet her gift for plainspoken rapture about art remains intact on the page. 

When she singles out from the Met's vast collections an Ottoman sultan's elegant logo with its "small paradise" of painted flowers, when she peers at the tense body of the young cheat in Caravaggio's The Cardsharps at the Kimbell, or ambles along the length of a Sung dynasty landscape painting at the Cleveland museum, that's when Sister Wendy proves the value of close, patient looking as a contemplative act. --Cathy Curtis - Amazon.com
Hardcover: 288 pages
HarperCollins; ISBN: 0060195568; (November )

Sister Wendy's 1000 Masterpieces
by Wendy Beckett, et al
This handsome tome is packed to the gills with paintings, and while readers might disagree with any of Sister Wendy Beckett's choices (that's half the fun, perhaps), there are still hundreds of unforgettable works of art that nearly any reader can appreciate. Most of the pictures, even those that seem unprepossessing at first glance, are made riveting by Sister Wendy's quirky, personal narratives, in which the simplest of images is suddenly rendered a dramatic focal point. A perfectly ordinary Dutch scene by Hendrick Avercamp--Frozen River, 1620--shows people going about their business on a lively patch of ice where children play hockey and adults chat and work. Sister Wendy seizes on a fishing hole cut into the ice through which a circle of cold, black water is apparent. "The hole that has been cut in the ice can frighten us when our eye falls into it, and this is the only hint of the inherent danger of the scene," she writes ominously. In Anthony Van Dyck's magnificent portrait of Charles I of England, she observes of his regal hauteur, "In hindsight we can see the tragedy: that a man so remote from common humanity, so superb in his conceit, must be heading for a fall." 

There are bound to be some infelicitous matches in a book that is arranged alphabetically, such as the pages shared by Robert Mangold's hot, geometric Four Color Frame Painting No. 1, 1983, and Andrea Mantegna's profoundly reverent Dead Christ, 1480. And Rosalba Carriera's portraits look decidedly meretricious across from those of the masterful Mary Cassatt. But all in all, this is a page-turner with brief captions that offer guidance to any reader in search of the telling note that draws one to a work of art, whatever its era, style, size, or subject. --Martha Hardin - Amazon.com
Hardcover - 512 pages
DK Publishing; ISBN: 0789446030
 

Sister Wendy's Story of Painting (Second Edition)
by Wendy Beckett, et al
For those who've enjoyed the original, the good news is that the new edition of The Story of Painting has grown by more than 300 pages of photographs--magnified close-ups of details from nearly half the 450 paintings in the book. Fauvist paint strokes become mighty slabs; sparkling light on a Dutch still life is revealed as a series of tiny dots; the cheeks of a young man in an Italian Renaissance portrait betray a touch of five o'clock shadow. This kind of close looking is seductive, and it's an important part of Sister Wendy's direct, unpretentious approach to art. --Cathy Curtis - Amazon.com
Hardcover - 736 pages Enhanced edition (October 1, )
DK Publishing; ISBN: 0789468050
Child's Book of Prayer In Art
by Wendy Beckett, Sister Wendy Beckett
(Hardcover)

Sister Wendy's American Masterpieces : Sister Wendy Beckett's Selection of the Greatest American Paintings
by Wendy Beckett, Patricia Wright
Listed under American Art History

The Duke and the Peasant : Life in the Middle Ages (Adventures in Art Series)
by Wendy, Sister Beckett, et al
Reading level: Ages 4-8
(Hardcover)

Sister Wendy's Book of Saints
by Sister Wendy Beckett
(Hardcover)

Sister Wendy's Nativity
by Wendy Beckett, Sister Wendy Beckett
(Hardcover)

Sister Wendy's Book of Meditations
by Sister Wendy Beckett
(Hardcover)
Out of Print - Try Used Books

Sister Wendy's Impressionist Masterpieces : Sister Wendy Beckett's Selection of the Greatest Impressionist Paintings
by Wendy Beckett, et al
(Hardcover)
Out of Print - Try Used Books

My Favorite Things: 75 Works of Art from Around the World
by Wendy Beckett
(Hardcover)
Out of Print - Try Used Books

Sister Wendy's Meditations on Silence
by Wendy Beckett
(Hardcover)
Out of Print - Try Used Books

Sister Wendy's Story of Christmas (Adventures in Art)
by Wendy Beckett, Sister Wendy Beckett
(Hardcover)
Out of Print - Try Used Books

Love: Meditations on Love by Sister Wendy
by Wendy Beckett
(Hardcover)
Out of Print - Try Used Books
 

Wendy Beckett on DVD
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